(Duck) Egg Bread

With the recent gift of fresh duck eggs came the desire to use them in just the right recipes. I have read many things about the difference of duck eggs from them being a bit richer in taste to giving baked goods more loft and texture. I had 3 very distinct recipes in mind.
duck egg
The first recipe I tried was a duck egg custard. Unfortunately in my eagerness to try this particular recipe I used the only “milk” I had on hand, Almond Milk, and in doing so, promptly wasted my first 3 eggs. It was awful stuff. Lesson learned, real dairy ONLY for custard making. Though the chickens didn’t seem to mind the grainy texture and almost “instant” taste of it, so I guess it wasn’t a complete waste.

The second was egg bread. On our homesteading journey I have been steadily reducing our consumption of pre-made baked goods, bread, tortillas and what have you. I successfully created a wheat bread that Midge happily eats (Yay me!). We all LOVE homemade corn and flour tortillas *swoon* they are delicious! French bread – No words for the pleasure that comes from eating it, so good. But the Hot Dog and Hamburger bun department I had yet to create that perfect bun. See how I said ‘had’? Yep, that is where this next recipe comes in. Duck Egg Bread! I have made this bread with our chicken eggs before (Well, me as in Midge and her friend Tiny)
0727132325b
This is the perfect bread for French toast. Slice it thick, dredge it in that creamy mixture of eggs and milk with a splash of vanilla extract and a couple shakes of ground cinnamon, then cooked on a hot griddle till fluffy and golden brown…Oh my gosh I need to go cook breakfast!

Ok anyway, back to the recipe.

My first stab at hot dog buns yielded rolls so bready (is that a real word?) there was no room for the dog, they were so dense the only way to choke them down would be like the pros at hot dog eating contests where they soak the bread in water to get them down. These things were awful! Into the freezer they went, until they were forgotten about and eventually discovered on a cleaning mission where they then went out to the chickens to demolish (Got to love chickens, nothing goes to waste). The next attempt was a complete 180 degree about face from the first; we didn’t have to worry about having too much bun as these came out flat and hard – breadsticks. Oops, oh well, Foxy Roxy enjoyed that batch as they were definitely more akin to a dog biscuit than a hot dog bun. It was clear something needed to change. I had tried a white bread recipe and a potato bread. The potato bread is great for hamburger buns but just not what I was looking for in the way of hot dog buns.
Then I found inspiration in an unlikely source…

One of my favorite guilty pleasures is grabbing that ridiculously inexpensive, giant hot dog after a shopping trip (or even without the shopping) at Costco. I mean really? That giant dog and a drink for less than $2? The buns they serve are the best, not too much bread, not too chewy, but strong enough to hold all the tasty toppings. That is the hot dog bun I want to create for my family. Perfectionist? Yeah, maybe.
Lucky for us I am that obsessive about good food or we would have never come to this
2014-06-20 15.15.00-1
Egg Bread (Sans Bread Machine)
Ingredients:
4 ¾ cup bread flour
2 ¼ teaspoons active dry yeast
1 1/3 cups milk (I used almond, it’s what I had)
3 Tablespoons sugar
3 Tablespoons butter
½ teaspoon salt (I used sea salt, it’s what I had)
2 eggs (Duck if you have them, but chicken eggs will do)

Directions:
1. In a large mixing bowl, combine 2 cups flour and the yeast; set aside. In a medium saucepan heat the milk, sugar, butter and salt just till warm (120F to 130F), stirring constantly. Pour the milk mixture into the flour/yeast mixture. Add the eggs. Beat with an electric mixer on low to medium speed for 30 seconds; scrape the sides of the bowl often. Beat on high speed for 3 minutes. With a wooden spoon, work in as much of the remaining flour as you can.
2. Turn the dough out on to a floured surface. Knead the dough until it is smooth and elastic. (The trick here is to not add too much flour, I found a slightly wetter dough aides in achieving a lighter, airier final product). Shape the dough into a ball. Place in a lightly greased bowl, turning to coat all sides. Cover and let rise in a warm, draft free location till double in size (about 1 hour).
3. Punch down dough, turn onto a floured surface. This is where I divided the dough in half; I turned one half into a loaf and the other half I divided into 12 equal portions to turn into hot dog buns.
*For the loaf, gently roll out or just pull and stretch the dough into a rough rectangle about 9”x 16”. Beginning on a short end, roll up the dough, pinching seam to seal and pulling ends under. Place in a greased loaf pan, cover and let rise in a warm, draft free location until about double in size (about 1 hour)
*For the hot dog buns, gently stretch each dough ball out into rough rectangles about 5-6 inches long and (honestly?) as wide as you can get it, likely only a couple inches. Starting on a long side, roll up, pinching the seam to seal. Gently pull the end under. Place seam side down on a greased cooking sheet. At this point, your dough is going to look more like the dog than the bun. Repeat with remaining dough. Place about 2 inches apart on the baking sheet. Prepare 2 baking sheets as one won’t hold them all. Cover and let rise until double in size (about 1 hour)
4. Bake in a 350F degrees oven.
For the loaf – 25-30 minutes or until golden brown and sounds hollow when tapped.
For the buns – 20-25 minutes or until golden brown and sounds hollow when tapped.
SAMSUNG
Bread Machine Version
Ingredients:
1 1/3 cup warm milk
3 tablespoons butter, softened
2 eggs
4 ¾ cup bread flour
3 tablespoons sugar
½ teaspoon salt
2 ¼ teaspoon active dry yeast

Directions:
Place all ingredients in bread machine bowl in the order listed. Create a well in the center for the yeast. Place bowl in machine, select the Dough setting and start.
Once the cycle is complete, turn dough onto a floured surface. This is where I divided the dough in half; I turned one half into a loaf and the other half I divided into 12 equal portions to turn into hot dog buns.
*For the loaf, gently roll out or just pull and stretch the dough into a rough rectangle about 9”x 16”. Beginning on a short end, roll up the dough, pinching seam to seal and pulling ends under. Place in a greased loaf pan, cover and let rise in a warm, draft free location until about double in size (about 1 hour)
*For the hot dog buns, gently stretch each dough ball out into rough rectangles about 5-6 inches long and (honestly?) as wide as you can get it, likely only a couple inches. Starting on a long side, roll up, pinching the seam to seal. Gently pull the end under. Place seam side down on a greased cooking sheet. At this point, your dough is going to look more like the dog than the bun. Repeat with remaining dough. Place about 2 inches apart on the baking sheet. Prepare 2 baking sheets as one won’t hold them all. Cover and let rise until double in size (about 1 hour)
Bake in a 350F oven.
For the loaf – 25-30 minutes or until golden brown and sounds hollow when tapped.
For the buns – 20-25 minutes or until golden brown and sounds hollow when tapped.
SAMSUNG
Enjoy!

Oh and that third recipe I mentioned earlier? Well, that was going to be fresh pasta, but Sunday morning, while typing this post up, I was so hungry for French toast that I used the last 3 duck eggs for that. I had a serious battle, in my head. I desperately wanted to hold on to my last precious duck eggs to make fresh pasta with but I just couldn’t see using chicken eggs on my duck egg bread. One day, this will be a choice I won’t have to make, one day.

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3 thoughts on “(Duck) Egg Bread

  1. Wow! Those rolls look delicious and I have two dozen duck eggs on hand! I’m bookmarking this for later in the week. Thanks for sharing your recipe.

  2. Pingback: Excess Eggs? Freeze 'em Up! - Ever Growing Farm | Ever Growing Farm

  3. Pingback: A Triumphant Weekend | Cluck & Hoe

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